Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Recycling’ Category

This Saturday, November 15 is Americal Recycles Day and I was planning to take a trunk full of E-Waste (broken radios, calculators, toaster oven, lamp) to a local high school which is collecting it to recycle. However, this Sunday’s episode of 60 Minutes made me question whether this action is simply dumping the problem on China: The Electronic Wasteland.

So now I’m unsure what to do with my E-Waste.

Here’s some more information on organizations that are trying to do something about this problem:

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Somehow, I managed to miss all pre-press about The Bottle Project in Atlanta, an installation in a park walking distance to my house. Last night, I was walking over there, and happened upon part of it that remains – it was supposed to be installed through September, but it looks like the Department of Watershed Management destroyed it as part of a runoff control project. Here is the part that I saw (photos are from my cameraphone, sorry for the poor quality):

The Bottle Project - Web

The Bottle Project - Entryway Post

The igloo or dome was gone. I hope they’ve simply moved it during the watershed project and will return it when that is complete.

I was curious about the artists and any other info about The Bottle Project, so I looked it up when I got home and found the above linked Blogspot page, along with the following coverage from the local Public Broadcasting station: Sunken Garden Park – The Bottle Project, including a recorded interview with one of the artists, Pam Longobardi.

Here is info on the project from the Blogspot site:

The Bottle Project is a temporary public art project created for Atlanta’s Sunken Garden Park by artists Craig Dongoski, Pam Longobardi and Joe Peragine. The project explores the invisible network of connectedness that runs through everything, whether human or non-human, built or naturally occurring. This network can be made visible by examining the flow of water, both local and global. Atlanta is experiencing the longest drought in our collective memory, and yet very little conversation about conservation has occurred. The reaction of habit and convenience is to buy bottled water. The natural network of water flow has become artificial and commodified. Plastic that never disappears off the earth is being produced and used by the billions every day to contain and transport this naturally mobile substance. We are attempting to make visible a problematic cycle that needs to be re-thought.

Read Full Post »

If you have not yet seen The Story of Stuff by Annie Leonard, I highly recommend it. It’s a clever 20-minute video about the production/consumption/disposal cycle and what it is doing to the earth and to people. A la An Inconvenient Truth, you can sign up to host a screening (some schools have done this and posted their experiences) – my daughter loves to watch it and discuss how we can contribute less to the Golden Arrow.Watch a snippet here, and then click on the link above to visit Annie’s site.

Read Full Post »

This article in yesterday’s New York Times about concert pianist Soyeon Lee’s efforts to raise awareness about recycling and reusing was really neat. She wears gowns made from recycled juice pouches and plays pieces that have been “recycled”. After watching the Story of Stuff together, my daughter and I decided not to use juice boxes anymore. I now give her milk every day in a little Rubbermaid Litterless Juice Box instead of the Soy Dream juice boxes I had been using.

Read Full Post »

I’ve been following the work of Margaret and Christine Wertheim, founders of the Institute for Figuring, for a few years now. I tried my own hand at hyperbolic crochet, and was invited by Margaret to contribute to her coral reef project. At one point, I had intended to make something of the collection of blue New York Times bags I’ve been collecting, but I have not had enough time to put into crafting in quite a while.

In any case, the hyperbolic crochet coral reef and toxic reef projects have continued without my participation and is now a wonderful exhibit at the Chicago Cultural Center. Exhibition dates: October 13 -Dec 16, 2007. See more photos here (Chicago Exhibition) and here (toxic reef).

Finally, read more about the project on the Institute for Figuring‘s website. Excerpt:

…this collective celebration is motivated also by an ecological urgency, for coral is being devastated by global warming, agricultural run-off, urban effluent and marine pollutants. 3000 square kilometers of living reef are lost every year, nearly five times the rate of rainforest elimination. Ironically, as reefs disappear a sinister substitute is growing beneath the waves: In the north Pacific ocean the world’s plastic garbage is accumulating, fifty years of plastic trash building into a vortex twice the size of Texas and 30 meters deep. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, as it is known, is a ghastly analog to the Great Barrier Reef, an aquatic “wonder” of appalling dimensions that continues to accrete. To highlight this monstrosity and our own role in its making, the latest spawn of the IFF is a toxic reef called Bikini Atoll – a hybrid assemblage made from yarn and plastic garbage. Our challenge for the future – and the reason we have chosen to exhibit this work– is to help raise awareness of this plastic problem, an ecological cancer whose stain will mar our planet’s face for geological time.

Read Full Post »

StartMotions

Finally, some more trashy art! Via the NRDC magazine, OnEarth, I learned of StartMotions a studio that generates stop-motion animation films of animals made from trash!

The studio’s mission is:

We create fun and entertaining animations that inform and enthuse audiences around the world about animals, plants, and the environment. We explore current events and environmental issues and use them to metaphor the relationships between humans and animals in memorable animations. Our main goals are to promote compassion and interest in animals so people invest in their long-term survival, to improve people’s knowledge about pressing environmental issues, to encourage recycling, preservation, and efficiency, and to inspire other projects of similar nature and mission.

Read Full Post »


Photo by R.W. Scott

This morning, a beautiful hummingbird came to my kitchen window to inquire as to why I had not yet provided the customary sweet water? So, I promptly corrected the error, of course!  I normally feed the hummingbirds sugar water (1 part sugar to 3-4 parts water) from May through September.

Did you know you can make a hummingbird feeder from an empty soda bottle?

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »